The Historic Fire Hall for Engine Co.18 in Nashville, Tennessee is known and loved by many. It served as a fire station from 1930 to 1986. Due to neglect, the building became an eyesore and eventually a homeless camp. Vacant and deteriorating since an accidental fire in 2011 the Metro Codes Department placed a demolition order on it.

Nashville Interior designer Karen Goodlow took ownership of the severely damaged building with a vision that it could be a beautiful repurposed building that would serve the community once again. A place that artists, creatives, and small business owners can use, enjoy, and thrive.

They anticipate having artist studios and small business spaces for lease by January 2016. The main engine bay will house local fine art, locally roasted coffee, and architectural antiques. It will also be available for art shows, events, and art classes for the public to enjoy. #rebuildthestation

Read More HERE: http://www.historicnashvilleinc.org/news/recentnews/2011/12/02/gallatin-road-fire-hall-to-be-saved-despite-last-nights-fire.315880

unnamed
Historic Fire Hall for Engine Co.18, Nashville
4 Comments

4 thoughts on “Historic Fire Hall for Engine Co.18: #RebuildTheStation”

  1. chris peters

    I searched your blog for info about the collaboration between Mike and Christian Watson that was posted on instagram, but I can’t find anything about it. Did Christian create the Two Lanes logo? What is the status of this collaboration? It’s a match made in Heaven :-).

    1. Meghan Aileen

      Hello! Christian is working on a new Two Lanes logo as of right now actually and there are some projects we will announce in January with the two of them together. He also designed 2 of our shirts coming out in spring :) So stay tuned! Are you on our email list?

  2. Eric Howell

    I’m thrilled that the historic fire station is being saved, rather than torn down! I’ve kept an eye on that old station for probably close to 30 years, always thought it was a neat example of early 20th century architecture. Recently, I was concerned that it had fallen in such disrepair, that it might have fallen victim to the wrecking ball. I’m so pleased about the rescue and repurposing of this historic structure, I plan to frequent the art gallery when it opens! Looking forward to Nashville’s community support for this new endeavor.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>