WELCOME TO NASHVILLE’S BIG BACK YARD

Mike Wolfe’s latest passion project, Nashville’s Big Back Yard is a virtual showroom highlighting 12 small towns between Nashville, TN and The Shoals, AL, giving folks the opportunity to explore unique small town Main Streets and open spaces as an option for relocating to or visiting.

The communities in Nashville’s Big Back Yard represent a new lifestyle opportunity that will reshape the way America lives, works, and socializes.

Mike has always had a passion for small town preservation and community. He hopes Nashville’s Big Back Yard will be a resource for those that are looking to make a move away from the high cost of rent in cities. These rural communities are anchored by two creative urban hubs and the scenic Natchez Trace.

Small is the next big thing! It is time to embrace a simpler, more affordable life in Nashville’s Big Back Yard. The “Back to the Land” movement is here to stay.

Watch the video below to hear Mike with more…

WHY NOW?

“Uncertain times have a way of making us rethink how and where we want to live and work.”, says Mike Wolfe. “With the changing landscape of American business to include more opportunities for working remote or running a business online, now is the perfect time to make the move back to small town Main Streets and open spaces.”

This area is close to Mike’s heart not only because of his passion for small towns, but because this is his actual backyard! He lives, rides and plays throughout this region and along the historic Natchez Trace, a 500-mile footpath connecting Mississippi to Tennessee. This gorgeous Two Lane drive is known for fishing, hiking trails, picnic stops, and uninterrupted views—not a billboard in sight. Sitting quietly along this historic route are beautiful small towns and rolling landscapes waiting ready to be explored by you.

“We’re all at a crossroads,” explains Mike. “Times like this make us think about what is important for us and our families. What if we could move forward with one foot in the past and the other in the future? Why would we continue to watch the American Dream and it’s history crumble and fade away under our watch when these places still exist — and they need us just as much as we need them.” says Mike.

 

Follow Nashville’s Big Back Yard on social!

READ THE FULL PRESS RELEASE ON NASHVILLE’S BIG BACK YARD BELOW

 

 

PRESS RELEASE: PUBLISHED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2020

MIKE WOLFE, COMMUNITY LEADERS LAUNCH ‘NASHVILLE’S BIG BACK YARD’

New Regional Movement Promotes Rural Quality of Life in Age of Coronavirus

MOUNT PLEASANT, Tenn. — American Picker Mike Wolfe is joining leaders from 13 rural Middle Tennessee and Northwest Alabama communities to launch a new regional movement dubbed “Nashville’s Big Back Yard.”

Nashville’s Big Back Yard (NBBY) is a region anchored by 100 miles of the scenic Natchez Trace Parkway that connects communities with populations under 5,000 — from Leiper’s Fork, Tenn., down to The Shoals of Ala. In the age of coronavirus, small communities are seeing a surge of interest from people who are drawn to rural living, remote work, and an affordable lifestyle.

“This global pandemic is making folks rethink how and where they want to live and work,” said Wolfe, a rural Williamson County resident who has traveled tens of thousands of miles and gained millions of fans as the star and creator of HISTORY’s “American Pickers” series. “I know first-hand how much rural communities have to offer. Now is the perfect time to think about getting out of the cities, and back to small town Main Streets and open spaces. I’m honored to help shine a light on the communities in Nashville’s Big Back Yard.”

To help roll out Nashville’s Big Back Yard, Wolfe produced a series of social media messages and videos on location throughout the NBBY region. The content is being used on Facebook and Instagram to promote rural Middle Tennessee communities — including Centerville, Clifton, Collinwood, Hampshire, Hohenwald, Leiper’s Fork, Linden, Loretto, Mount Pleasant, Santa Fe, Summertown, and Waynesboro — as well as The Shoals area of Northwest Alabama.

“We appreciate Mike’s support of our movement to engage people who may be looking for a change of pace and a different quality of life,” said Lewis County Mayor Jonah Keltner. “We’ve always considered ourselves to be a vital back-yard support system for cities like Nashville, and we think now is the right time to promote a regional approach to living and working.”

Kevin Jackson, executive director of the Shoals Economic Development Authority, added, “We are pleased that The Shoals area is one of the major anchors for this movement. The Shoals area is uniquely positioned for growth as people move from densely populated cities in search of a better quality of life. This movement will draw national attention to our area and will drive more visitors, including investors, here to explore what we have to offer.”

NBBY is the result of lengthy conversations during COVID-19 spearheaded by Leiper’s Fork philanthropist Aubrey Preston and led by community leaders in a region long known as a destination for musicians, artists, and other creative talent.

“While COVID has dealt a devastating blow to our nation’s public health and economy, it also has led many people and communities to think about who we are and what we do,” said Preston, who has spent more than 25 years working on rural preservation efforts such as the internationally known Americana Music Triangle. “The land is calling people back, and Middle Tennessee and Northwest Alabama have plenty of beautiful open space.”

Preston added: “We’re just saying, come and check us out. Come and play in our big back yard. Come and experience a simpler life.”

Many Americans already are heeding the call. In spring 2020 researchers at the Harris Poll conducted an online survey that found nearly 40 percent of U.S. adults living in urban areas said they would consider moving “out of populated areas and toward rural areas.” The top draws: More wide-open spaces and a more affordable lifestyle.

According to data from the National Association of Realtors, median home prices in Nashville’s Big Back Yard averaged less than $170,000 — nearly 30 percent below the national median home price of $241,300.

Meanwhile, the Pew Charitable Trusts has identified Tennessee as one of nine states implementing “promising practices” to speed the deployment of high-speed internet service into rural areas — enabling more effective remote-work options.

“For decades, our communities have been hit hard by loss of jobs and globalization,” said Rena Purdy, executive director of the Wayne County Joint Economic & Community Development Board. “Now, during this unprecedented public-health crisis, we have an opportunity to boost our rural economies and showcase our quality of life to Tennesseans and Americans who may be looking for a change of pace.”

For more information, visit nashvillesbigbackyard.org.  

Contact: Cindy Dupree
cindybdupree@gmail.com
615-838-9616

Contact: Judy Hood
jdyhood@aol.com 
256-577-6077

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15 Comments

15 thoughts on “Mike Wolfe And Community Leaders Launch ‘Nashville’s Big Back Yard’”

  1. Candy Lehman

    Great video – visited the Pickers store when we were in
    Iowa. Amazing country side -one of the most beautiful areas in the USA.

  2. Kathleen Lambert

    This is incredible! I’ve lived in Philadelphia my entire life. I have been visiting the Nashville area since 2011 and I’ve come to feel so at home there. I have made friends that mean so much to me and have recently felt drawn to look for property in the area. Your video moved me, particularly when you spoke of community. I started a small business here in Philadelphia and have lived in my current home for almost 25 years. I know about the community of which you speak, it makes where you live a true home. Some of my “teachers“ remind me to pay attention to the “signs“ and your @nashbigbackyard project launch is confirmation that I am on the right path. Jimi has been a huge help so hopefully we will be neighbors in no time @mikewolfeamericanpicker

  3. Connie Douglas

    God bless you Mike Wolfe! This is just amazing and so much fun to walk through all these wonderful towns! I love your show and have saved everyone of them in my TV. But this Big Back Yard is your future! This is what we need to inspire all of us to get off out butts and rejuvenate America’s small towns. I recently retired from having lived and worked in Los Angeles County all my life, and moved to Oak Harbor, Whidbey Island, Washington. Compared to your small towns Oak Harbor is a huge metropolis, but It is a small town compared to where I came from. Its MY small town. I have a farm with chickens, goats and an apple orchard and I’m in heaven. At 74 I’m starting an Airbnb and will be hosting weddings in the big red barn in the spring. You are an inspiration! Keep up the great work. So many areas of our country need and deserve this rejuvenation! Sending love and blessings!

  4. Jerry L.

    I’m 62. Grew up in Southern California and moved to Utah in 2000. Our kids are grown and my wife Eileen and I married 44 years just inherited her childhood home which we are selling. It will give us enough cash to go wherever we want. Thanks Mike for this video. I am going to see if my wife and I can make it out to look around these towns. My father was born in Sawdie Daisy TN
    Who knows…..

  5. Murray Dinneen

    I totally agree with you Mike. I live in New Zealand and my family are moving out of the big city to a smaller city-country like-to live out our years with less hassles and expenses. I think it will be the best thing we have ever done. GO COMMUNITYS… MURRAY

  6. Ken Stowell

    Mike is one of a kind. Unfortunately, a dying breed. The “people” now a days don’t care about such nonsense. They would rather have their cars drive them along while they play on there phones instead of driving and looking at the cows, old homes and such. I’m 64, and I still remember the 5 of us kid’s piling in a 57 Ford 4 door with my two parents and just following the road every Sunday. No phones laptops iPads or anything. It was great!

  7. Vidar

    Hi Mike
    I live in Norway , but love to follow your TV program , it is so fun and i Learn a lot about old stuff .
    I ride a bike myself, a Honda 250 nx , and love it when you find a good old bike.
    I have family in North Dakota and we visit , I have been visiting them and vise versa .
    Keep up the good work , I love your tv programs .

    Vidar Bråten

  8. Lynda Parker

    I know of a DeLorean in Anchorage Alaska that is rusting away for years at a restaurant called China gardens. If you get in town I’d love to help you acquire it. Look forward to hearing from you!

  9. Victoria Watts

    This is an amazing idea! I live in between Summertowm TN and Hohenwald Tn! It’s a beautiful area here and wonderful homes and farms available! If anyone is wanting to start a new adventure in rural America in the beautiful state of Tennessee please reach out to me!!!!
    Victoria Watts
    931-797-0477
    Victoriawatts@kw.com

  10. Cheryl Lohmann

    Mike Wolfe, hats off to you! This is wonderful. My husband and I own a beautiful place in Centerville! We are so excited to see what you find in all these small towns. Come on over sometime. We’ve got a neighbor that has a real collection of stuff and stories you’d love to see and hear.

  11. Steve Parker

    I’ve watched every episode of your TV programme American Picker’s , more than once , watching the latest just started here. Love your passion, love the programme, keep it coming.
    Steve Parker
    Torquay,
    Devon,
    England.

  12. David Pokrywka

    At one time you said, “We will do anything for a buck.” Well here is your chance. It is collect containers of old refrigerant. There are three primary gasses sitting in old garages and barns. As featured on NPR there are two guys in Califonia making a full time living paying up to $400.00 for seventeen pounds of old refrigerant. They load all the contents into a big semi with a big pressurized tank. Then they hall it to a facility which disposes of it buy burning at a very high temp. The process destroys 99.9999% of the gas. They get paid in “Clean Air Credits” which they convert into cash.

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